The history of St Patrick’s Day

by Charlotte.Barnes on March 17, 2011

St Patrick’s Day is on March 17th and it’s a time to celebrate Irish culture and their patron saint.

Saint Patrick was born Maewyn Succat in Wales during the 4th century. He was captured by Irish raiders when he was a teenager and sent to work as a slave in County Mayo in Ireland. During this time he is said to have turned to God and had a dream that told him to escape.

The very next day he fled and made his way back to Britain, more than 200 miles away. When he got home he had another dream telling him to take Christianity to Ireland.

Once again he did as his dream said and spent the next 15 years training to become a priest, choosing Patrick as his Christian name.

He made his way to Ireland ready to convert the country from Paganism to Christianity. He used the shamrock to explain the father, son and Holy Ghost. This is where the tradition of the shamrock on St Patrick’s Day comes from.

After nearly a decade of spreading God’s word to the Irish, he died on March 17th 461 AD. The Irish decided to remember him with a day of his own and St Patrick’s Day was born.

In the 1990s the Irish government decided to use St Patrick’s Day to showcase Irish culture and heritage. Before then it was simply a feast day to celebrate the man himself. Various Irish cities and towns now hold St Patrick’s Day festivals.

Even outside Ireland the day is celebrated; in the UK, the USA and various other countries there are parades and parties.

Although blue used to be the colour associated with St Patrick, it slowly changed to green to match the shade of the shamrocks he used to explain the holy trinity. Now, we dress in green and wear shamrocks to pay homage.

Since 1962 Chicago has been dyeing its river green, as have various other cities across America. The fountain in Trafalgar Square in London has also been dyed green for the occasion.

To celebrate St Patrick’s Day why not decorate your home in Ireland’s colours. A mixture of Interflora bouquets can really bring the Irish spirit into your home.

Combine orange and white roses with vibrant green foliage with the Orange Six Stolen Kisses and the White Heavenly Rose Hand-Tied. Or, if you’re looking for even more colour, the Orange Beautiful Basket is a wonderful combination of orange and white flowers with green salal and pittosporum.

The next occasion on the calendar is Mother’s Day. View our range of Mother’s Day gifts to browse and buy.


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Charlotte Barnes

Post category: Flowers, Occasions  

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